First Nations LNG Alliance Newsletter 19 – Our Alliance’s wise words

The two quotes above are from our Alliance CEO, Karen Ogen-Toews, on LNG Canada’s Facebook page, which has 17,000 followers. It ran the quotes with: ‘Karen Ogen-Toews offers more insight into the necessity of Indigenous consultation and the need to find a path forward together.”

  • Her words were from her guest column in The Province newspaper.
  • Karen is also quoted in this Business in Vancouver story: ‘First Nations interested in taking stake in Coastal GasLink pipeline in BC.’

That ‘pullquote’ above led readers to the messages that Chief Crystal gave to a news conference at the BC Natural Resources Forum in Prince George. Here below is a photo from the event, and what she had to say:

LNG once-in-a-lifetime opportunity

Chief Crystal Smith: “We said yes to LNG Canada and Coastal GasLink, because the proponents and the Province of British Columbia have approached us from a position of respect for our Nations and our people.”

And then came a social-media message from another Crystal Smith of the Haisla Nation — Crystal A. Smith:

To that posting, our Chief Crystal said online: “Congratulations Crystal!”

A new campaign for LNG

The Together For LNG campaign now is under way. Its invitation: “Be a part of the growing community of interest that supports LNG development in B.C.” You’ll also see it on Facebook and on Twitter—and we’ll be sharing some messages.

 


 

In the News

  • Work has begun on the LNG Canada project at Kitimat, with crews and equipment now on the site
  • Woodfibre LNG: ‘We are set to begin construction of the LNG plant in 2019, with operation in 2023.’ And with Squamish Nation approval.
  • Coastal GasLink pipeline will mean thousand of jobs, and benefits for local economies and First Nations
  • CGL will generate an estimated $20 million per year in ongoing property tax benefits to BC communities.
  • The BC LNG Alliance names its new president and CEO, Brian Cox
  • Black Diamond given go-ahead for Coastal GasLink work camp
  • Chris Sankey, former First Nation councillor: ‘I don’t know what to make of how irrational protests have become.”