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Blog: LNG and careers, not just jobs

While we support the responsible development of natural gas and LNG, and the benefits that can mean for First Nations, decisions on development are, in the end, made by the First Nations themselves, and rightly so. But that can be a thoroughly complicated process under the varying forms of First Nation governance: Who makes the…

Pipeline benefit: a cultural revival

The benefits the Wet’suwet’en First Nation looks for from natural-gas pipeline proponents are typical—jobs, training, education, and revenue to the community. But councillor Erwin Tom lights up as he talks of an unusual benefit: cultural revival and reinforcement. As with many other nations, some traditional practices had faded. There’s not been that much in recent…

Huu-ay-aht look to LNG to help ‘close the gap’

Huu-ay-aht First Nations, a modern treaty Nation on the west coast of Vancouver Island, really understand sustainable and profitable business. Forestry and fisheries are among key foundations of the strategic plan for the self-governing nation of close to 750 people. Tourism, mining, renewable power, and port development are further possibilities. For the next step now,…

For the Haisla, LNG is spelled HOPE

The Haisla First Nation comprises about 1,800 people, more than half of them living in Kitamaat Village, 10 km south of Kitimat. “We have lived off the land and waters of our traditional territory for thousands of years, and it remains the focus of all we do,” the official history runs. Fisheries and forestry have…

What? No market for LNG?

One thing you can say for BC Green Party leader Andrew Weaver: When he takes a position, he can sure stick to it: “I’ve been saying for four years, there is no market for LNG.” And as recently as March 27, he was still on it: “The reason why we have no LNG industry here in…

First Nations LNG Alliance Newsletter